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Argyle Street

Opened: 5th November, 1979.

Argyle Street Station is situated on the Argyle Line, which connects Rutherglen in the south-east of the city with the North Clyde lines at Partick, and serves the centre of Glasgow. The Glasgow Central Railway was formed in 1888 to link the Clydesdale Junction and Lanarkshire & Ayrshire Railways with the Lanarkshire & Dunbartonshire Railway. The line opened between 1894 and 1897, by which time the Glasgow Central Railway had been taken over by the Caledonian Railway. Although three stations were situated beneath under Argyle Street: Anderston, Glasgow Central and Glasgow Cross; there was no station at the site of the present Argyle Street.

The former Glasgow Central Railway closed in 1964, but the central section of the route was rebuilt and reopened by British Rail in 1979. Glasgow Central Low Level Station reopened but Glasgow Cross Station was not re-opened; its place being taken by the new Argyle Street Station which was situated mid-way between Glasgow Cross and Glasgow Central, adjacent to the Argyle Street shopping district and the St. Enoch Centre. A simple island platform was required, but footings of adjacent buildings and other physical constraints limited the available tunnel width for the new station. Moreover, the roadway above had not yet been pedestrianised, and street access and station building construction was not acceptable within the road limits. Accordingly, the station premises were constructed within the building line on the south side of Argyle Street, with access to the ticket hall via entrances on Argyle Street and Osborne Street. From the ticket office, an escalator leads down to a passageway beneath the westbound track and a second escalator leads up to the narrow and often crowded island platform, which is located directly beneath Argyle Street. Lift access was not provided due to expense and limited platform space.

Wikipedia page.


A view of Argyle Street in July 1976, before pedestrianisation and the construction of the entrance to Argyle Street Station. Many people would not then have realised that a railway tunnel ran beneath Argyle Street from Glasgow Cross to Anderson Cross. The former Glasgow Central Railway closed in 1964 but was partly reopened in 1979 as the Argyle Line. A new station named Argyle Street was provided just opposite Marks & Spencer's store. A peculiarity of this station is that passengers arriving at the station have to descend beneath the railway before ascending by escalator to reach street level. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]
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Anderston

Opened as Anderston Cross: 10th August, 1896.
Closed: 3rd August, 1959.
Reopened as Anderston: 5th November, 1979.

Anderston Cross Station was opened on 10th August, 1896, by the Glasgow Central Railway. It was closed by British Railways on 3rd August, 1959. The original station building was demolished in 1968 as, like many other ornate and historical buildings in the area, it lay in the path of the M8 motorway. The station was reopened, renamed Anderston, as part of the Argyle Line project on 5th November 1979 by British Rail and Strathclyde PTE, and retains some of the original architecture at platform level. Anderston Station serves Glasgow's financial district and, across the M8 motorway, the housing schemes of Anderston West and the Blythswood Court estate of the Anderston Centre. It is also close to both the Hilton and Marriott hotels. It is a manned station with an island platform, and most of the structure is underground.

Anderston Station now has a comprehensive and frequent train service. Westbound services consist of two trains per hour to Dalmuir via Yoker, two trains per hour to Dalmuir via Singer, and two trains per hour to Milngavie via Westerton. Eastbound services consist of two trains per hour to Whifflet with an hourly extension to Motherwell, two trains per hour to Larkhall via Hamilton, one train per hour to Motherwell via Hamilton and one train per hour to Cumbernauld via Hamilton and Motherwell.

Wikipedia page.


BR Standard Class 4 2-6-0 No. 76002 arrives at Anderston Cross Station on 22nd July, 1959, with the 5.40pm Maryhill Central to Whifflet Upper train. The platform canopies had been removed, and the station closed a few days later. Anderston Cross reopened in 1979, renamed plain Anderston, as part of the electrified 'Argyle Line'. [W.A.C. Smith]
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Bellshaugh Junction

Bellshaugh Junction was situated on the Lanarkshire & Dumbartonshire Railway's route from Partick to Possil. Passenger services were withdrawn on 5th October, 1964, and the line closed to all traffic on 22nd February, 1966.


Preserved ex-GNSR Class F (LNER Class D40) 4-4-0 No. 49 Gordon Highlander and ex-NBR Class K (LNER Class D34) 4-4-0 No. 256 Glen Douglas head east at Bellshaugh Junction on 14th September, 1959, with a train of empty carriages from Kelvin Hall in connection with the Scottish Industries Exhibition. Faintly visible in the background through the mist is the tall chimney of Kelvindale Paper Mill. [S.C. Nash]

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Clydesmill Power Station


A westward view in September 1976 of Clydesmill Power Station, which was situated on the south bank of the River Clyde roughly mid-way between Carmyle and Cambuslang in the south-eastern suburbs of Glasgow. Coal was brought in by way of a connection from Westburn Junction on the Glasgow Central Railway. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]
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Strathclyde Junction


Ex-LMSR Class 3 2-6-2T No. 40188 crosses the newer of the parallel bridges which formerly crossed the River Clyde between Rutherglen Station and Strathclyde Junction with the 12.38pm train to Balloch on 11th March, 1961. This bridge has since been dismantled and present-day electric services use the adjacent bridge immediately upstream. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Parkhead Stadium

Opened as Parkhead: 1st February, 1897.
Renamed Parkhead Stadium: 3rd March, 1952.
Closed: 5th October, 1964.

Parkhead Stadium Station served the district of Parkhead in the east end of Glasgow. It was opened by the Caledonian Railway as Parkhead on 1st February, 1897. In recognition of its proximity to Celtic Park football stadium, it was known as Parkhead (for Celtic Park) by 1904, and it was also referred to in some timetables as Parkhead for Celtic Park. The station was renamed Parkhead Stadium by British Railways on 3rd March, 1952. The nearby Parkhead Station on the Coatbridge Branch of the North British Railway was renamed Parkhead North on 30th June, 1952. Parkhead Stadium Station closed on 5th October, 1964.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LMSR Class 5 4-6-0 No. 45029 arrives at a deserted and rainswept Parkhead Stadium Station with the 4.06pm Coatbridge Central to Dumbarton train on 25th September, 1964. [W.A.C. Smith]
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Dawsholm Shed

Dawsholm Locomotive Shed was situated in the north-west of Glasgow, near Maryhill. The eight-road shed had an allocation of around fifty locomotives during the 1950s, most of which were for goods work. The shed was situated in a very cramped location, with the main building tucked into a corner hard against a rock face to the north-east and Kelvindale Road to the south-east. It closed on 3rd October, 1964, with the majority of its allocation being transferred to Grangemouth and Polmadie Sheds.


BR Standard Class 4 2-6-0 No. 76103 and ex-North British Railway Class B (LNER Class J35) No. 64477 stand in the sidings at Dawholm Shed on 10th June, 1959. Other ex-LNER locomotives at this ex-LMSR shed on this date included Class N15 0-6-2Ts and a Class N2 0-6-2T. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Maryhill Central

Opened as Maryhill Barracks: 26th November, 1894.
Renamed Maryhill: 1st October, 1895.
Renamed Maryhill Central: 15th September, 1952.
Closed: 5th October, 1964.

Maryhill Central Station served the district of Maryhill in the north-west of Glasgow. To the west of the station was a triangular set of junctions. Immediately to the west of the station was Maryhill Central Junction where the line to Kirklee diverged to the south and the Lanarkshire & Dunbartonshire Railway headed east to Bellshaugh Junction. The station served the nearby Maryhill Barracks and it was from this station that tanks and soldiers departed for Buchanan Street station in order to be deployed at George Square in the 'Red Scare' of January 1919. Maryhill Central ceased to be served by trains from the Glasgow Central route on 2nd November, 1959, on 5th October, 1964, by trains from the Lanarkshire & Dunbartonshire route between Possil and Partick, with the lines in the area being closed on 5th October, 1964.

The site of Maryhill Central Station is now occupied by Maryhill Shopping Centre, which was built in the early 1980s. However, a space was left in the basement of the shopping centre to allow the line to be re-opened in future; this was still considered an option in the mid-1990s when, with the building of a large bingo hall on the site, a channel was provided for the original line to be re-opened below ground-level. However, this option was eliminated with the sale of land for housing along many parts of the track in the Kirklee and Cleveden sections of the route, along with the demolition of many of the bridges in the area for safety reasons. Maryhill Shopping Centre was demolished in early 2010 and replaced by a new Tesco supermarket. The void beneath the supermarket for the railway station has again been retained to allow the future possibility of reopening the railway line.

Wikipedia page.


Viewed from Garrioch Road, the 4.57pm Clydebank Riverside to Possil train, hauled by an ex-LMSR Class 4 2-6-4T, has passed Kelvinside North Junction and is approaching Maryhill Central Station on 10th September, 1963. This was a workers' train, conveying some of the thousands who worked at John Brown's Shipyard at Clydebank, and this train and the corresponding morning working were at this time the only trains using the west side of the triangle to Partick West Junction. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Dalmarnock

Opened: 1st November, 1895.
Closed: 5th October, 1964.
Reopened: 5th November, 1979.
Closed for refurbishment: 3rd June, 2012.
Reopened: 23rd May, 2013.

The present Dalmarnock Station was situated on the Glasgow Central Railway, now known as the Argyle Line, and opened on 1st November, 18905. It was built adjacent to an earlier high level station which opened on 24th June, 1841, and closed when the present station opened. The earlier high level station was situated on the Rutherglen & Balornock line, often referred-to as the Switchback line. The present station is 2¼ miles south-east of Glasgow Central Low Level Station, and serves the district of Dalmarnock in the east end of Glasgow. The station is fifteen minutes' walk away from the Parkead Stadium of Celtic Football Club. The northern part of the station is located in a tunnel.

Dalmarnock Station underwent a revamp for the 2014 Commonwealth Games. This is the second station to bear this name. The station underwent a full revamp in connection with the 2014 Commonwealth Games due to its proximity to the athletes' village and several sports venues. Lifts have been installed and a new street-level entrance and ticket office constructed. The station closed for renovation on 3rd June, 2012, and reopened on 23rd May, 2013.

Wikipedia page.


A southward view towards Rutherglen at Dalmarnock Station in July 1977, during the rebuilding of the central section of the Glasgow Central Railway. Paved track has been installed but not much more. Dalmarnock Station has recently been refurbished in conjunction with the 2014 Commonwealth Games, many of the venues for which were located nearby. Sadly, the more conveniently-located Parkhead Stadium Station remains disused. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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